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Did You Say ‘Pet-Friendly Plants?’ We’ve Got ‘Em.

Did You Say ‘Pet-Friendly Plants?’ We’ve Got ‘Em.

Here’s How To Stop Pets and Wildlife Bothering Your Plants.

It’s no surprise that animals like plants as much as we do but in showing their appreciation Tiddles and Lassie chew leaves and stems, dig out the potting mix, and generally make a mess of your lovely leafy foliage. 

Pet friendly houseplants - non toxic houseplants

And it’s not just the mess that’s a problem, because some plants are poisonous to pets! So, what’s a plant-loving pet-owner to do?

Hold Up. You don’t have to choose between plants and pets because we’ve created a furry friend's indoor pack. Yes, that’s right! You can enjoy gorgeous greenery and lay pet poisoning worries to rest.

Furry Friends Pet Safe Houseplants Delivered

This pack changes depending on what’s in season but it’ll most likely include pet-safe ferns, palms, and peperomias. Yes, you can pick your own mix also, we just ask that you make sure your pet-friendly plant selection is in stock and leave any plant swap-outs at the cart.

We’re also labeling up our plants with ‘pet-friendly’ notices such as the amazing prayer plant, but if you don’t know what you want yet just pop ‘pet-friendly’ into our search box and it’ll come up with a list of our pet-safe babes.

Once those pet-friendly plants arrive in the post here are some ways to keep claws and teeth away from your gorgeous greenery. They may not be poisonous, but you still want to keep them looking good.

Use Plenty Of Height

Shelves are one of the best ways to keep your babes safer from pets and it's one of the best ways to showcase loads of plants too.

A plant shelfie full of upright plants that show off colourful pots alongside wavy draping ivy looks magical. Just keep those drapey bits high up else they’ll get dragged off.

There’s no reason why you can’t have a shelf or two in every room. Way to go!

Feeling Prickly

Large plants that can’t get any vertical are a digging ground or even a toilet for pets – eek! No manners.

Grab some large pine cones or gravel and cover the potting mix. This prevents soil from being thrown across the carpet and you can still water the plants no problem.

Mmmmm. Is That Lemon?

The majority of animals don’t like citrus or peppery smells so placing slices of lemon, orange or lime in a plant pot reminds them to back off.

The plant won’t mind one bit, but Tiddles will. Remember to change the slices regularly to keep the citrus whiff fresh.

Give Them Their Own Plant

Cats, dogs, house rabbits and birds like to nibble on greenery so gifting a plant is an obvious step.

Cat grass is long, tempting and chewable for all animals. It’s especially good for indoor pets that don’t have access to a garden.

Grasses such as wheat, oats, or barley make for very inexpensive cat grass and your furry friends love it.  Let your pets chomp away on their own tasty greenery then everyone is happy and it might distract them from your babes.

How About the Outdoors?

Outdoor plants are at risk of pets and wildlife 24/7. They all just want to eat your best plants.

Here’s how to deter them.

Getting A Little Spicy In The Garden

We’ve already mentioned citrus or spice as one of the best ways to keep pets from indoor pot plants and this works a treat outside too.

Try sprinkling Tabasco sauce around the base of your garden plants. Chili flakes, curry powder or cayenne pepper work too and no, plants don’t mind. You will need to do this regularly as spices wash away in the rain.

Shoo the Roo's away 

Kangaroos like to eat your plants, they pretty much demolish them. Fencing can be a good idea, but kangas have been known to simply push through them or the bigger boys just jump it!

The best way to stop the roos is to make the area totally undesirable. Trim back the trees to reduce shade - shelter. Reduce large, open areas for them to move around - plant low shrubs. In the remaining open spaces, keep your grass trimmed short to slow grazability.

Motion-detecting lights can discourage nighttime feeding. Hang a few noise deterrents, such as tin cans, near your garden and along the borders of your property. Limit outdoor access to water.

Fence off any water points that might attract them and fence off anything you don't want to be eaten. Reuse plastic or mesh, tree guards, netting, or old chicken wire from the tip, either placed around or on top of your new plants. Try sticking to plant varieties like Grevillea Callistemon, Hibbertia & Kangaroo paw they are less attracted to these. Try and guard your plantlets for the 1st year. 

Try A Gravel Mulch

If you have diggers then placing spikey twigs in the soil keeps their paws off. A classier look is a mulch of sharp gravel and stone chip. This also works as a mulch to suppress weeds and keep in moisture so it’s another win on both counts.

Make a Doggy Dig Pit

Dogs like to dig - it’s natural but boy does it damage your plants.  An area your pooch can dig without destroying anything is a good use of space.

Fork over a small area and bury a dog chew. Once they’ve found it your dog will keep going there with positive reinforcement. That’s a win. If the dig pit looks unsightly place some tough evergreens around to shield it from view. A Lilly Pilly would do the job nicely.

There’s no need to choose between pets and plants after all. Just grab our furry friends pack to be on the safe side then get busy with shelves, lemons, and gravel.

Now you can reclaim your sitting room with a jungle of oxygenating, happiness-bringing foliage. Just as it should be.

Pets and Plants - how to stop them from eating your plants